Last edited by Akilrajas
Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

6 edition of Democracy, empire, and the arts in fifth-century Athens found in the catalog.

Democracy, empire, and the arts in fifth-century Athens

  • 219 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Athens (Greece),
  • Greece,
  • Athens,
  • Athens.
    • Subjects:
    • Democracy -- Greece -- Athens -- History -- To 1500.,
    • Arts, Greek -- Political aspects -- Greece -- Athens.,
    • Athens (Greece) -- Civilization.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 427-492) and index.

      Statementedited by Deborah Boedeker & Kurt A. Raaflaub.
      ContributionsBoedeker, Deborah Dickmann., Raaflaub, Kurt A.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDF275 .D35 1998
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 504 p. :
      Number of Pages504
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL357226M
      ISBN 100674197690
      LC Control Number98017113

        The Greek Polis and the Invention of Democracy presents a series of essays that trace the Greeks’ path to democracy and examine the connection between the Greek polis as a citizen state and democracy as well as the interaction between democracy and various forms of cultural expression from a comparative historical perspective and with special attention to the place of Greek democracy in. In Athens, democracy proved stronger than disease; rather than crumbling, argue Josiah Ober and Federica Carugati of Stanford University in a forthcoming paper, the Athenian system evolved.

      Athens were able to take back their city and restore the earlier form of government. This topic is especially relevant to the world in which many of us live today; that is, a world we consider to be equal and democratic. There are, of course, many similarities between Athens in the fifth century B.C. and modern political systems.   His recent publications include Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (co-authored, ), The Discovery of Freedom in Ancient Greece (), War and Society in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds (co-edited, ), and Democracy, Empire, and the .

      The Peloponnesian War resonates with contemporary events like few other episodes in ancient history. Though a democracy, Athens warred with its neighbors for decades in a doomed bid to secure its Aegean and Mediterranean empire. The ambitious city-state's eventual reward was defeat and tyrannical rule, effectively ending Athens's Golden Age, which flourished during the war in the fifth century BC. Hughes draws on a very wide range of primary sources and archaeological evidence in order to paint a vivid portrait of Athens in the fifth century BCE as well as Socrates himself. Although I have not chosen this book as a required text, it would make a wonderful supplement to our readings and discussions.


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Democracy, empire, and the arts in fifth-century Athens Download PDF EPUB FB2

The product of a colloquium at Harvard's Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C., Democracy, Empire, and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens sheds new and the arts in fifth-century Athens book on a much debated question that has wide implications.

The book is illustrated and enriched by a comprehensive bibliography on the : Paperback. Athens in the fifth century B.C. offers a striking picture: the first democracy in history; the first empire created and ruled by a Greek city; and a flourishing of learning, philosophical thought, and visual and performing arts so rich as to leave a remarkable heritage for Western civilization.

/ Lisa Maurizio --Reflections and conclusions: democracy, empire, and the arts in fifth-century Athens / Deborah Boedeker and Kurt A. Raaflaub. Series Title: Center for Hellenic Studies colloquia, 2. Fifth-century Athens was a democracy, and an imperial power.

What was the connexion between these two characteristics on the one hand and the city’s artistic achievement on the other. The book appears with impressive speed, only three years after the conference on which it was based, held at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington DC in Author: Simon Hornblower.

Athens in the fifth century B.C. offers a striking picture: the first democracy in history; the first empire created and ruled by a Greek city; and a flourishing of learning, philosophical thought, and visual and performing arts so rich and the arts in fifth-century Athens book to leave a remarkable heritage for Western civilization.

To what extent were these three parallel. Athens in the 5th century BC offers a picture of the first democracy in history; the first empire created and ruled by a Greek; and a flourishing of learning, philosophical thought, and visual and Read more.

Product Information. Athens in the fifth century B.C. offers a striking picture: the first democracy in history; the first empire created and ruled by a Greek city; and a flourishing of learning, philosophical thought, and visual and performing arts so rich as to leave a remarkable heritage for Western civilization.

A history of the world’s first democracy from its beginnings in Athens circa fifth century B.C. to its downfall years later The first democracy, established in ancient Greece more than 2, years ago, has served as the foundation for every democratic system of government instituted down the centuries.5/5(1).

Deborah Boedeker is the author of Democracy, Empire, and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens ( avg rating, 2 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), Aphrod /5. Buy Democracy, Empire and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens (Centre for Hellenic Studies Colloquia) New edition by Deborah Boedeker (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. BOOK REVIEWS/COMPTES RENDUS sociologists such as Norbert Elias are expressed in clear English. It is a book which can be recommended to readers at any level.

UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM THOMAS WIEDEMANN DEMOCRACY, EMPIRE, AND THE ARTS IN FIFTH-CENTURY ATHENS. Edited by DEBORAH BOEDEKER and KURT A. RAAFLAUB.

Cambridge Mass.: Harvard. Hölscher, T. Images and Political Identity: The Case of Athens Democracy, Empire, and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens Boedeker, D.

Raaflaub, K. Cambridge, MA Harvard University Press Hornblower, S. Mausolus Oxford Clarendon Press Cited by: Athens is often considered to have been the birth place of democracy but there were many democracies in Greece during the Archaic and Classical periods and this is a study of the other democratic states.

Robinson begins by discussing ancient and modern definitions of democracy, he then examines Greek terminology, investigates the evidence for other early democratic states and draws conclusions.

IN THE FIFTH CENTURY B.C. Although' the primary values of Athenian democracy, isegoria, isonomia, and koinonia all imply political freedom and equality before the law, the Athenians willingly acquired an empire in which the subjects faced both limited political freedom and.

Wallace, RWThe Sophists in Athens. in K Raaflaub & D Boedeker (eds), Democracy, Empire, and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens. Cambridge, MA, pp. The Sophists in by: 3. This book has been cited by the following publications.

Free Speech and Democracy in Ancient Athens is an invigorating work that will be of interest to both classicists and political scientists/theorists alike.' “Attic Old Comedy, Frank Speech, and Democracy,” in Democracy, Empire, and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens, edited by Author: Arlene W.

Saxonhouse. Athens' democracy developed during the sixth and fifth centuries and continued into the fourth; Athens' defeat by Macedon in began a series of alternations between democracy and oligarchy. The democracy was inseparably bound up with the ideals of liberty and equality, the rule of law, and the direct government of the people by the people.

Democracy, Empire, and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens 作者: Boedeker, Deborah (EDT)/ Raaflaub, Kurt A. (EDT) 出版社: Harvard Univ Pr 页数: 定价: 元 装帧: Pap ISBN: Raaflaub's book thus illuminates both the history of ancient Greek society and the evolution of one of humankind's most important values, and will be of great interest to anyone who wants to understand the conceptual fabric that still shapes our world views.

Democracy, Empire, and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens; and War and Society in the. Democracy, Oligarchy, and the Concept of the "Free Citizen" in Late Fifth-Century Athens. Kurt A. Raaflaub - - Political Theory 11 (4) Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece. A history of the world’s first democracy from its beginnings in Athens circa fifth century B.C.

to its downfall years later The first democracy, established in ancient Greece more than 2, years ago, has served as the foundation for every democratic system of .Co-founder of the "Center for Hellenic Studies Colloquia" series (); organizer (with Deborah Boedeker) of CHS Coll.

2, "Democracy, Empire and the Arts in Fifth-Century Athens" (August ) and (with Nathan Rosenstein) of CHS Coll. 3, "War and Society in .Ancient Greece first coined the concept of democracy, yet almost every major ancient Greek thinker-from Plato and Aristotle onwards- was ambivalent towards or even hostile to democracy in any form.

The explanation for this is quite simple: the elite perceived majority power as tantamount to a .